Yoenis Cespedes, Dingers & The Fun Value

I love baseball. I love the Mets. You know what else I like? Fun. I like having a good time. I like when my baseball is fun baseball and not a boring collection of strikeouts and grinding out walks in long, terrible at-bats no matter the strategic value of said plate appearances.

Enter Yoenis Cespedes.

When he came over to the Mets in the 2015 trade deadline deal from the Detroit Tigers, we knew he was an impact bat, but by no means did we expect this offensive juggernaut that we would embrace as one of ours even close to as quickly as we did and then demand he be brought back for the largest annual value contracts in the history of the team.

Which poses the question: why did we fall in love with Cespedes so quickly? Simple: he makes baseball fun to watch and his time at the plate is must-see, destination viewing. If you miss a Cespedes at-bat, you’re doing yourself a great disservice.

We love characters, we love power, we love larger-than-life personalities and Yoenis checks off all of those boxes. When he launched his first homer last night off of Clay Buchholz to put the Mets ahead 3-0, we marveled at the sheer ferocity with which he swings. When his second of the game shot out to left field, we were in awe of just how hard he could sting a baseball. For most other players, that point of contact would have hooked the ball foul, but not Yoenis. He’s so brutally strong and slammed walloped that ball so viciously that he was able to keep it straight enough long enough before it was able to slow down its flight path and tail toward the wrong side of the foul pole.

How do you top that? Just hit a third one. In a game where it felt like the whole lineup was having a good day, Cespedes still found a way to be the singular person in the spotlight. Three homers. The second time he’s done that as a member of the Mets and the very first Mets player to ever have two such games in the history of the franchise.

For a team that is now in its 56th season, anytime you see a player achieve a “first” in team history is an impressive feat.

Cespedes is better than any of us gave him credit for when he was first brought over during that 2015 season. He single-handedly carried that squad through the last eight weeks on his back to a division title and then followed that with an equally impressive 2016 season even factoring in some time lost to injury.

When people questioned his level of dedication following a huge contract signing this offseason, he reported to spring training in absolutely ridiculous shape and reiterated his desire to not only win a championship (you have to say the political thing), but also to achieve a personal goal of winning the National League MVP award (which is something no Mets player has ever done). Personally, I love that.

ap_mets_horsin_around_baseball_80131736.jpg

He’s got a flair. He’s got style. He wants to be the best. I don’t care how many different cars he shows up to work in. I don’t care how many horses he owns. I don’t care how often he plays golf during his time off. When it’s time to play, Yoenis Cespedes has always shown up ready to go to work. And he makes things exciting, entertaining and fun when he does. You can’t ask for anything more.

Cespedes Is Back. So…What Next?

When the Mets re-signed Yoenis Cespedes to a four-year deal last week it was a move that was as necessary for GM Sandy Alderson as it is to breathe. There was simply no way the Mets could have moved forward with improving their roster for the 2017 season without having the big, Cuban slugger back in the middle of their batting order.

The fact that they were able to get things done as quickly and painlessly as they did, however, is probably the nicest surprise of all. Last year, I think we were all convinced that Cespedes was as good as gone following the amazing run to the World Series, but once the market for him didn’t develop, the team was able to swoop in late and retain the offensive powerhouse for what was, essentially, an incredibly team-friendly one-year deal.

Letting him walk this year, however, simply wasn’t an option. Cespedes had an awesome 2016 and showed he’s the type of star attraction that can thrive in the New York market. For a team with over 50 years in the league, the Mets haven’t necessarily had a very long litany of truly great players as even filling out a top ten list can be so varied that there would be very little consensus amongst of group of people charged with making the list.

Cespedes gives the Mets exactly what they need right now. A genuine superstar, a dynamic offensive presence and someone who embraces the town of New York and what it offers all while staying away from all the negative stuff that has hampered athletes en masse over the last few years. If the worst thing about the guy is that he likes to play golf on his time off, you would take that anytime. The man got paid, let’s not pretend that he didn’t, but the team got him back on their terms too with only having to commit to him for four years through his age-35 season.

Besides re-signing their superstar, the team also got this done early enough in the offseason where they’re able to head into today’s Winter Meetings in Nashville fully ready to execute whatever the rest of their plan is for constructing their roster for next season.

Which begs the question: with Cespedes back, what’s next?

The team was absolutely hammered by injuries last season and, as much as I hate Terry Collins, he was able to get them to the Wild Card game in a year where nobody would have hammered him all too hard if they hadn’t gotten that far. What kept them in that spot, though, wasn’t really an incredible managing job, it was the fact that they played in an overall mediocre league and were able to take advantage of what was the strength-of-schedule over the final month to sneak their way in.

With the starting rotation on track to be ready to go for Spring Training, there is still some problem areas for the Mets to address in Nashville this week. Not the least of which is the outfield. At the beginning of last season, the Mets tried to fit Cespedes into center-field where he played admirably during the 2015 World Series run, but ultimately isn’t well-suited for over the course of a full season. This year, the team recognizes that, in order to protect their investment while maximizing the return they get from Yoenis, he has to play left-field, a position where he’s been a Gold Glove winner in the past.

An upgrade for an everyday center fielder is necessary and – internally – there isn’t a lot of desirable options. In a perfect world, Juan Lagares would be at a place in his career where he’s finally seized the opportunity and has evolved into a somewhat consistent hitter to go along with his excellence defensively, but he has yet to prove he can hit right-handers. Curtis Granderson is at an advanced age and no longer has the range to patrol CF with any regularity. The Mets are flooded with outfielders best suited for corner spots and it’s imperative to make a move somewhere.

The Ideal AKA Pipe Dream:

Trade Granderson AND Jay Bruce, Sign Dexter Fowler

I don’t think this has any shot of happening, but this would be the best possible scenario I can think of. It allows Michael Conforto to continue to develop as an everyday player in RF and gives you a legitimate everyday CF in Fowler who just played a key role on a World Series winner.

Jay Bruce was having a good season with the Reds before coming to the Mets, but whether it was just the adjustment of joining a new team for the first time since getting to the Majors or not being able to handle the pressure of NY, he became just the latest big name acquisition to be booed in no time by the Queens faithful. The Mets picked up his option for 2017 which gives him a price tag of $13M which makes him a rather good deal if he’s producing. That being said, he’s an atrocious defensive OF and, on a team loaded with corner OFs is the obvious trade candidate.

Granderson has been everything you want as a representative of your ballclub. After a rough 2014, he single-handedly kept the team afloat offensively in 2015 before they were able to trade for Cespedes. Last year started off mired in dreck, but he picked up considerably over the final six weeks. That’s all in addition to being a quality human being who is very active in charities and promoting the brand in the most positive of ways. He’s also been an incredible veteran voice to the younger guys as they’ve come through the system and the stories of players saying how helpful and supportive he is inside the clubhouse are endless.

That being said, there does seem to be quite a bit of interest in both him and Bruce and, in my mind, if you’re able to tandem these three moves together, you’d be enhancing your roster in the most optimal of ways.

The Likely:

Trade Bruce, Keep Granderson

From everything being reported, both players are intriguing to teams around the league, but the Mets would prefer to trade Bruce over Curtis. I get it. It makes sense. Grandy has had success here while Bruce, in a short sample, has not. If you’re set on trading one, please let it be Bruce. Granderson isn’t an everyday CF, but I suppose he’d be able to get some time there and in RF and still give Conforto the regular reps needed to continue his development. This isn’t a horrible option, it’s just not the golden ticket.

The Far Fetched but still has some talk around it:

Trade Bruce and Conforto

OK, so we’ve established the team would like to move Bruce. But would they really be open to trading their former first-round pick who a year ago looked like a cornerstone for the next decade? Sources say: no, but they are listening when people call. When Conforto was called up in 2015, he impressed enough to be penciled in as a starter going forward, but he started 2016 struggling and never really recovered after Terry Collins started benching him. He became pull-happy and was demoted to Triple-A to figure things out. He produced like gangbusters in Vegas, but upon being recalled to the big team, had a hard time getting off the bench again.

I’d say it’s still too early to give up on him and, apparently the team feels that way too as there’s no serious talks of moving him. They’re just keeping an open mind in case something intriguing does come through. That’s fair and smart, but with the year “Scooter” just had his value has to have plummeted and a return on him wouldn’t be anywhere close to as impressive as it may have been a year ago.

The Winter Meetings are just getting going and the word on the street makes it sound like the Mets have laid all the groundwork to be able to strike early this week. While it may seem that Jay Bruce is as good as gone, I never put anything past Sandy Alderson. I have the utmost faith in the man and he’s definitely earned it after 1 1/2 postseason appearances in the last two years.

What’s been interesting about all these rumors is that – while we’ve heard certain teams linked to these players – I haven’t seen one instance of what the return would be for any of them. It’s constantly bandied about that the Mets would want bullpen help or may look to replenish the cupboard of prospects as they’ve gotten thin in minor league depth, but there’s been nothing solid in terms of “here’s what’s being offered”. Obviously, that has me scratching my chin, but as I said, trust Sandy. He’s the baseball maverick, after all, and has built a roster that, in theory, has an open window to compete for at least a few more years.

Feel free to send me any feedback. I’m on Twitter, @MaximusSexPower or can be emailed at ShoesOnSports@gmail.com.

Thanks for reading.

 

The Outfield: An Awful Lot of Questions; Not Many Answers

The Mets need Yoenis Cespedes. That’s basically the simplest sentence I’ll ever write. There should be no debate of that point either. Once he decides to opt out of his current deal, re-signing the slugging left fielder should be the priority for Sandy Alderson and company.

But – should the team be able to retain Cespedes – that would open up a number of other questions in the outfield for the 2017 team. Mainly, what do you do – if anything – with Curtis Granderson, Jay Bruce, Michael Conforto, Brandon Nimmo and/or Juan Lagares?

That’s a lot of names vying for playing time in 3 spots and, as much as I’ve already gone over this, I still haven’t figured out a solution that would satisfy me going into next season.

That being said, let’s break down the possibilities on each:

1. Yoenis Cespedes

An absolute necessity.There is no permutation for next season that I will be happy with that doesn’t include Cespedes. He’s going to opt out and he’s going to get paid, but the team better recognize that you don’t let players of this quality just up and walk away because of money.

2. Curtis Granderson

I’ll be the first to admit that I’m not the biggest Grandy fan. I like him when he’s going well, but other times, not so much.He plays a serviceable RF, but has a wet noodle of an arm which constantly allows runners to take an extra base.

On the other hand, the man is an absolute pro. He doesn’t get too high or low and serves as a great example of what it means to be a big league ballplayer to the younger guys.

Granderson started 2016 in an absolute black abyss of a slump, but rebounded late to post decent numbers. He has 1 year left on his deal for $15M which may have looked like an impossibility to move in June, but he did show enough down the stretch that you’d think there has to be a team out there willing to take a shot on him for one year if the Mets are willing to eat some of that money.

He’s probably the player I’d be most interested in dealing, but I do worry about the effect such a move would have on the clubhouse as you constantly hear how beloved he is by his teammates. That being said, if there is a move to be made, you’d genuinely have to wonder about what kind of value you’d get in return for an aging, streaky player. I don’t know if anybody they would get in return would be anyone that would improve the current roster and you certainly don’t want to just give Grandy away for a nothing return. It’s a very complex situation. Which brings us to…

3. Jay Bruce

Acquired before the deadline for Dilson Herrera who was our 2B of the future, Bruce struggled mightily as he adjusted to a new team and city and was consistently booed for his collection of absolutely woeful at-bats.

Bruce has a team option for 2017 at $13M which you would think is a cinch to be picked up, but the issue becomes what you do with him after. Like Granderson, Bruce is a streaky, high strikeout guy and is comparatively just as bad if not worse than Curtis defensively.

With Cespedes making it clear that he’s no longer willing to play center field, it’s simply unreasonable to think the team can keep both Bruce and Granderson since having to play either one in CF is the equivalent of punting the position and will lead to balls dropping that should have been caught and runs scoring that never should have been on base.

Bruce is an interesting case because, if you feel you have to make a trade, he seems likely to bring back decent value because of his history and the fair dollar amount attached to him. But the idea of having a full-season of Bruce, Cespedes and Lucas Duda (which will be another blog in itself) is tantalizing for a team that had so much difficulty scoring runs down the stretch.

There has been talk of possibly moving Bruce to 1B (at least part-time), but as a lefty hitter, that’s basically waving goodbye to Lucas Duda while probably downgrading the position defensively. Once again, not an ideal situation.

4. Michael Conforto

What a weird year it was for Scooter. After a strong debut and solid performance into the World Series, Conforto looked like a lock to be patrolling LF for the next decade. Then a slump turned into a black hole which turned into a demotion to Las Vegas.

While in Vegas, he was able to get back to the things that had made him successful, but seemed to have lost every ounce of confidence from Terry Collins as it felt like he never played after rosters expanded in September.

Make no mistake: the Mets need Conforto to be successful. Besides just the on-field value he would bring, he offers a low-cost option in a lineup full of ever-rising salaries. While money should be less of an issue for the team coming off two reasonably successful seasons, they’re still not out of the woods yet when it comes the debts they built up due to the Bernie Madoff catastrophe and the restructuring of debt against both Citi Field and SNY.

Conforto, as with Granderson and Bruce, is not and probably should not be playing CF. He’s also been pushed from his natural LF since Cespedes took it back and only has limited exposure in RF. Once again, there’s been talk about getting him reps at 1B, but – as he also bats left-handed – that would once again force Lucas Duda off the roster or into a platoon that makes no sense.

Conforto had significant trade value, but it had to be impacted by 2016’s down year to where now you’d be selling low on a player that was looked at as a cornerstone just a few months ago. I can’t possibly see how you move him away at this point as there’s still so much upside should he get back to what made him successful in 2015.

5. Brandon Nimmo

The first draft pick under the Alderson regime, Nimmo made his major league debut this year and looked…eh, like a 4th or 5th outfielder right now. There’s obvious tools and he’s still young enough to put on some mass, but, at this point, Nimmo is probably ticketed to at least begin the season in Triple-A Las Vegas.

He was rumored to originally be included in the deal that eventually landed Jay Bruce, but that seemed to change at the 11th hour and he stuck with the team through September where he showed promise as a bench option with some key pinch hits while being able to provide a little speed late in the game as well.

Nimmo has a significant amount of experience playing CF in his minor-league career, but doesn’t project to be able to handle the position regularly. From what I’ve seen, I thought he looked adequate. Average at best, but it’s not like he was a tire fire out there.

Unless some kind of deal is struck during the offseason, I’d imagine he starts in Vegas where he had a breakout season in 2016. It remains to be seen how that will translate out of the high altitude of the Pacific Coast League or if he’d even be given an opportunity to contribute in Queens next season.

6. Juan Lagares

After a breakout 2014 season that saw him win a Gold Glove, Lagares signed a 4 year deal that provided him security and the team a friendly dollar figure should he continue to improve and build upon that terrific year. Unfortunately, for the Mets, he has failed to do so.

A combination of injuries and stagnation have brought Lagares’s development to a screeching halt and he’s been unable to refine his approach at the plate enough to make himself a genuine option to be an everyday player.

In a perfect world, Lagares learns to be respectable at the plate as his defense in CF would add significant value to his batting line and make this easy on the Mets where he would seize the position for himself and hold it down. Instead we’re left with the constant question of what we can reasonably expect from Juan and still patching in the Grandersons and Confortos of the world and hoping they don’t cost you a game with their defense while trying to jumpstart the offense.

It’s a tough situation and right now, you’d have to look at Lagares as the 4th outfielder until further notice. You hope he comes into spring training ready to go and really blows people out of the water, but he’s had the opportunity to do so for a couple of years now and has been unable to clamp it down.

He’s valuable as a late-inning defensive replacement and a RH bat, but he’s one of the few – if the only – players on this roster who could be classified as above average defensively and at a premium position – you’d wish he could get his game together enough where you can run him out there everyday to ease a bit of the burden on your pitching staff.

Which brings us to where we stand. Outside of the inherent need to hold on to Cespedes, the team looks to be playing musical chairs with the other two spots in the outfield with none an ideal fix. With a weak free agent class in the offing, Alderson and crew are going to have to be creative in making the necessary improvements needed in this roster while at the same time, not making a deal just for the sake of clearing a body.

It’s a very tough situation especially with the lack of seemingly obvious answers. Normally, I’m pretty certain about things I’d like to see, but this feels like a no-win situation. There are tons of possibilities and no real true answers. At the very least, the offseason appears as if it will be plenty interesting.

Playoffs?! Are Mets Playoff Bound? Would That Even Be Enough?

I try to have realistic expectations when it comes to the Mets and, a lot of times, those come off as rather negative, but – when it comes down to it – we all want the same thing: for the Mets to win the World Series.

Coming into the 2016 season, I said how strange it felt to actually have genuine expectations for this ballclub. As Met fans, we’ve basically gotten used to being out of things before the trade deadline, but still seem to enjoy the few bright spots whether that be an overperforming fan favorite (see: Dickey, R.A, 2012) or a singular moment of awesomeness (Santana, Johan, also 2012). There are times when the team is bad, but there’s still enough to have fun while taking in the day-to-day grind of the season.

There’s been plenty of years where I’ve gone to a ton of games during lost seasons and found ways to still maximize the fun value whether that be through cheap tickets, short lines for bathrooms and concessions or not having to wait to get out of the parking lot. That kind of stuff matters to a ballpark experience.

This year was different, though. Coming off a surprise World Series appearance last year, I knew I wouldn’t be able to get the same seats at the same prices anymore. I knew I’d have to wait a bit longer than usual to get a steak sandwich. More importantly, I knew I had a team on the field that wasn’t building for the future, but meant to contend right now.

To be honest, the fact that the Mets are only 6 games out in the NL East right now despite all of the injuries they’ve suffered in the lineup is an accomplishment in itself. The team has looked so inept offensively at times that you have to wonder just how much of a catastrophe this season would have been had the front office followed the original blueprint and not resigned Yoenis Cespedes.

But let’s not play the “what-if” game right now. Let’s take a genuine look at what we have as we start the second half tonight in Philadelphia. Can this team make the playoffs? Is making the playoffs enough to fulfill the preseason expectations? Can Daniel Murphy just leave us alone? Let’s examine.

IMG_2488

Is there enough pitching to hold this together?

This is the most important question and the answer isn’t as simple as it was even a month ago. Matt Harvey hasn’t been the Matt Harvey we thought we were getting and will now miss the remainder of the season due to surgery. For now, at least, he’ll be replaced in the rotation by Logan Verrett who has basically been your typical 6th starter/swingman out of the bullpen. Key thing to remember here is that while Harvey has a lot of name value, the performance that needs to be replaced wasn’t Cy Young level so Verrett should – hopefully – be able to give you what you were getting out of Harvey before the injury.

A bigger problem is the setbacks in the rehab of Zack Wheeler. Originally expected to be returning to the rotation around now, Wheeler has continually suffered what the team has classified as “minor” setbacks and hasn’t even thrown off a mound as of yet. That is not good. At this point, it’s basically unreasonable to expect any kind of significant contribution from Wheeler in 2016.

Which brings us to Noah Syndergaard and Steven Matz who both have bone spurs in their elbows which doesn’t even include Thor’s recent “dead arm” issue. If one or both of them decides that the pain from the spur is just too much and decides to have surgery to remove it, this team is dead in the water as there just isn’t the depth in the system that there used to be because of promotions, trades and Rafael Montero completely forgetting how to pitch. Bartolo Colon was brought back this season to give the team a bridge in the rotation until Wheeler would come back at which point he’d move into the pen and provide depth. He’s been terrific and the Mets have needed it as their best-laid plans have caught fire.

IMG_1508

Why didn’t they re-sign Daniel Murphy?

Look, Murph was here for a long time and was a nice player, but aside from two weeks in October, he never looked like the player he has apparently become. He’s on the wrong side of 30 and the Mets desperately needed to upgrade defensively after they were absolutely exposed in the World Series against the Royals. Allowing Murph to leave gave them the chance to add a comparable offensive player in Neil Walker who was a definite improvement with the glove while also being able to add a first-round sandwich pick in the draft after giving Daniel the qualifying offer. With Dilson Herrera waiting in Las Vegas to take over 2B in Queens, the ability to use Walker as a one year stopgap and get back another compensation draft pick when he leaves as a free agent after this year was a smart tactical decision by the front office. Sure, it stings that Murphy has had a great year and has hit something like 43 homers against just the Mets so far, but sometimes these things happen. I’m not rooting against Murph. For a team that lacks positive moments in their history, Murph provided us with one of the all-time great postseason runs – not just in Mets history – but in all of baseball. We should always be grateful for that.

reyes

Is Jose Reyes the biggest addition we’ll see for this lineup?

From how it sounds…probably. But is this enough? I wasn’t enamored with the idea of signing Jose. As much as I was a fan during his first go-round in Queens, the combination of declining skills and him grabbing his wife by the throat and slamming her into a door didn’t exactly put him at the top of my list. But he’s here. He’s shown obvious signs of rust which is to be expected since he hasn’t seen major league action since last October, but, aside from that, there does appear to be something left in the tank. He’s obviously motivated to reclaim his career and – even if he isn’t as fast as he used to be – he’s still a net positive on the basepaths (as long as he can get on base with any consistency) because the Mets – as a team – may have the least footspeed of any team ever. This team is strictly station to station which limits the things you can do offensively if you can’t steal a base or go first to third on a single to right or even score from second on a base hit. This team needs to be able to generate more runs so Reyes could be valuable if he finds even some of what made him special way back when.

The lineup will still need another addition, but it’s doubtful it will come from outside the organization in another Cespedes-type acquisition like last year. Lucas Duda seems no closer to returning than he did when he first went out and the team may have to rely on Walker, Curtis Granderson to provide bigger second halves to go along with the return of Michael Conforto once he returns to the big club from a stint in Triple-A. Before going down, Conforto looked absolutely overmatched and was an automatic out. Hopefully, he comes back in a similar fashion that d’Arnaud did when he was demoted a few years back with a renewed approach and clear head.

collins

Is Terry Collins the right guy to be leading this team?

I hate Terry. It’s no secret. I can’t kill him too much this season because of all the injuries, but do I have faith that Terry Collins will be to outmaneuver anybody come crunch time? No. Not in the least. Unfortunately, barring an unforseen and atypical ballsy move by Alderson, Collins is here to stay.

Mets

Is this a playoff caliber team? Is just making the playoffs enough?

Can this team as currently constructed make the playoffs? Tough question. I’d lean toward yes, they can, but it’s far from a sure thing. The Marlins have been surprising and while the Pirates haven’t played as well as you may have expected, there’s still plenty of time for them to get hot. The Dodgers currently hold the first Wild Card spot, but if Clayton Kershaw’s back injury is anything longer-term than thought, they are in real trouble with a thin rotation.

The Mets had huge expectations coming into the year with a maturing pitching staff that was considered the best in the game and a solid lineup that Collins never figured out how to work before everybody dropped like flies anyway. I am not confident that the Mets will catch the Nationals. It wouldn’t be absurd if they did, but this is not the Nationals of last year. They’re playing with a chip on their shoulder and are taking extra enjoyment each time they can humble the Mets, especially when Murphy is the one leading the way.

The Mets will have to slide in as a Wild Card where they have as good a shot as anybody as long as they don’t lose any of the other pitchers. But would that be enough to satisfy preseason expectations?

Honestly? Yeah. To me, yes. The Mets – in their history – have only qualified for the postseason in consecutive years one time (1999-2000). That’s it. We’ve sat through such consistency of losing that our great teams are standalone years as opposed to transcendent eras of winning. This team has enough pieces in place where this can be a sustained run of competitiveness and – with the amount of teams that now qualify for the postseason – should be playing meaningful September and October baseball for the foreseeable future.

Only eight teams (the two that lose the Wild Card game really don’t count) in the majors make the playoffs. It’s an accomplishment to get there after such a long season and should be respected and appreciated as such. As a Mets fan, you’ve learned to deal with extended periods of losing baseball while keeping the optimism high that the future holds better days. Well, that future is here. This team may not be blowing teams out of the water like the 86 or 06 teams did, but they’re a far cry from being “the worst team money can buy” of the early 90s.

Yes, missed opportunity to score a run from third with less than two out is going to frustrate you, but sometimes you have to take a step back and remember, “Hey…we went to the World Series last year.” I know I do. It actually happened. I have a cap and jersey that actually say “World Series” on it. Enjoy the good times, friends. Because, as we’ve seen, they can be fleeting and then you’ll be left wishing you enjoyed them more as they were happening.

Contact: @MaximusSexPower or via e-mail: ShoesOnSports@gmail.com

 

Game 5: Don’t Worry, It’s a Long Season

I hate being the negative guy. I genuinely do. And usually, I never am. I’m always happy and excited for the season to start and have found ways to enjoy even some really bad seasons on the field.

This year is supposed to be different. Like I’ve said multiple times, there are real and genuine expectations for this team this season. And a pair of lifeless, flat performances against a shitty team aren’t exactly encouraging signs.

If you’re reading this, you know what happened. The Mets lost in a very similar fashion to the way they did yesterday. Matt Harvey wasn’t amazing, but he wasn’t horrible either. The bats are still stuck in a deep, winter slumber.

Yoenis Cespedes did hit a two-run homer to make it a one-run game in the sixth and temporarily wake up the crowd, but that was as close as they would get as they went down quietly and without fanfare.

With that being said, here are some notes and takeaways from a game I can’t wait to forget:

  •  Curtis Granderson has had an awful start to the season. He’s now 1 for 20 with that singular hit coming last Sunday night in Kansas City. He did look to have a few good swings today so maybe he’s getting his timing back or whatever, but this team leans heavily on Granderson who single-handedly kept them afloat offensively last year when he was pretty much the only competent big leaguer in the lineup until the end of July.
  • There is one more year left on Grandy’s deal after this season and, while some regression is expected as he gets older, you hope it’s not too drastic. The lineup isn’t perfect (although, it is improved from even the end of last season), but Granderson does represent their best option in the leadoff spot. With the roster as currently constructed, I don’t even know who you would in that spot should some kind of shake-up be required.
  • David Wright had a couple of hits today giving him 1750 for his career and moving him into a tie for 413th on the all-time hits list with the immortal Deacon McGuire. That’s kind of nice. I think we’re pretty much all cheering for David, but watching him – even on a good day – makes you wonder how much longer his body will allow him to continue to do this. He did make a nice play barehanding a dribbler early in the game, but his throw had zero zip on it. The team has a lot invested in him between dollars, history and future marketing, so he’ll be given every opportunity to do as much as possible, but it’s not crazy to think that his time as an everyday player may be coming to an end a lot sooner than any of us had expected.
  • Addison Reed did a helluva Mel Rojas impersonation today.

Look, losing two of three to the Philthies isn’t the end of the world. But I expected more from these guys coming out of the gate. Maybe it’s the scheduling or the cold weather, I don’t know, but you have to take advantage of the – as Keith would say – second-division teams. Last year, the Mets took 8 of 9 from the Phils at home. They’ve already given away two.

This is going to the theme for the season. There is absolutely no excuse to lose a series to these horrible teams that are doing their best to tank as hard as they can this season.

Life and baseball shall go on, however. We welcome the Marlins to Citi tomorrow in yet another series that they Mets should win. You want to be a contender? You have expectations. Time to meet them.

Feel free to reach out: @MaximusSexPower on Twitter or elshoeshatemail@msn.com

Game 4: Bartolo Shows Up, Bats Don’t, Mets Fall to Phils

You can say it’s just one game. And you’re right. You can say it’s just the fourth game of the season. And, once again, you’re not wrong. But when the Mets drop a 1-0 game to the Island of Misfit Toys, well, that’s not something I’m necessarily OK with.

The baseball season is long and arduous and over the course of it, you will have bad losses and “character” wins, but – in a year when you are a legitimate contender coming into a season for the first time in a decade – you cannot waste a six-inning, one run performance from an aging innings-eater and watch your lineup go silently into the night against Vince Velasquez and a quartet of Philadelphia relievers who recorded 12 strikeouts against the defending National League champions.

Bartolo Colon started for the Mets and was terrific giving up just one run over six innings while striking out seven, but got zero support from his lineup who managed just three hits in the game. His one miscue ended up in the Left Field Landing as Ryan Howard took him deep in the 5th, but that performance should have been enough to absolutely tap dance on the grave of a Phillies team that has already been buried in the 2016 season.

Yoenis Cespedes and Lucas Duda each recorded a hat trick of strikeouts and were backed up by equally bad at bats from pretty much everybody else. In the 8th inning, Asdrubal Cabrera, Cespedes and Duda all worked their counts to 3-0, 3-1 and 3-1 respectfully and none of them were able to reach base against David Hernandez, the owner of an ERA of 10.13 AFTER his scoreless frame.

The prevailing wisdom of the baseball season is never to let your emotion trend too high or too low. That is smart and that is wise when you think about just how long and exhausting emotional high and lows can be over a span of 162 games in 180 or so days.

The Mets had a lot of fun in spring training. There were cars and horses and it was great. I encourage that. I like to have fun at work too. And when Terry Collins said they were getting their work in, I trusted that. I still believe it.

For the first time in god knows how long, there was no overriding controversy. No malcontent player, no front office shaming. The focus was on a team that had made a surprising run to the World Series and that they were ready to get back and finish the job this time.

They bumbled through an uninspiring spring which was – for the most part – ignored because they games don’t count and guys were just getting prepared for the chance to defend their NL crown. But that lethargy has carried over from the embracing warmth of Port St. Lucie to trembling chills of Queens.

It may be just one game in the opening week, but it’s one game I don’t want to be talking about in September. The National League is top-heavy with that Nationals, Cardinals, Pirates, Cubs, Dodgers and Giants all expected to be in the mix for playoff spots. All have plenty of games against teams that are blatantly tanki…I’m sorry…”rebuilding” that will pad the win totals of the legitimate contenders and presumably lead to a lot of congestion at the top of the leaderboards come the conclusion of the regular season. One game has been in the past and could be again the difference between going home and meaningful October baseball. I just hope we’re not discussing listless April performance against an inept Phillies team then.

Feel free to reach out: @MaximusSexPower on Twitter, or elshoeshatemail@msn.com