Podcast! Awards! Postseason! Mets!

Greetings! You may or may not be aware that I do a weekly pop culture podcast (The Car JoeMez Podcast) which is a lot of fun to do, but following the Mets’ Wild Card loss to the Giants, we recorded a special baseball only episode where I speak about my IBWAA awards ballot, postseason predictions and I even examine what the future could bring for the Mets’ roster. Oh, I shit on Terry Collins too. You know how I do. Anyway, I hope you’ll give it a listen and if you like, maybe check out some of the other episodes.

The Wild Card Is Awesome…Even When Your Team Loses

Welcome to a post-Wild Card wrap-up on ShoesOnSports. The Mets didn’t get the result we were hoping for, but take a step back and think of that game before Jeurys Familia left that pitch up in the zone to Connor Gillaspie. Before that ball was smoked into the Mets’ bullpen…man, that game was fucking fun, wasn’t it?

You had two aces on the top of their games, mowing through the order like nobody’s business knowing full well that the first team to make a mistake probably loses.

It was drama of the highest form and – with the championship dreams of both teams hanging in the balance – we were treated to brilliance from the up-and-coming Noah Syndergaard and pure dominance from the postseason living legend that is Madison Bumgarner.

Over the past few days, the amount of talk that has gone on concerning the Wild Card format has been unreal. From what I see in my social media feeds and the blogs and articles that I read, there’s a minority of people who approve of the single-game play-in, while most would prefer some kind of series like a 2 of 3.

I’ve always been in the minority since this change was made to the Wild Card. Put more emphasis on winning the division and give the team with the best record an advantage since – in theory – the Wild Card winner would be burning their ace pitcher in the Wild Card game just to get through to the Division Series. You can say all you want that that’s not fair, to which I reply, it’s not supposed to be! If it bothers you that much, you should have won your division to not put your season on the line in one last game.

But if after watching both the AL Wild Card game be won on a walk-off homer by Edwin Encarnacion and then the NL game go to the 9th before the Giants were finally able to push across a marker, how can you possibly say this wasn’t awesome? Sure, you’re apt to have some stinkers in there, but you’ll get even more of them by adding more games. Plus, we’re in a period now where there’s already a shortage of pitching to handle all the innings for a team making a deep postseason run so adding more games to a schedule already overloaded isn’t exactly the best idea.

Either way, the one game format provides drama and excitement that we rarely get with divisional races anymore at the end of the regular season. Outside of the famous “Game 162” day of the 2012 season which was just bonkers, we probably hadn’t seen such a meaningful final day since the 1993 season where the Giants won 103 games, but didn’t make the postseason finishing a game behind the 104 win Braves.

These Wild Card games give us a dose of the drama while not sacrificing the integrity of the regular season. Teams now have a vested incentive in winning their division whereas before this play-in game, they make use the final weekend as an opportunity to align their rotation to play in the Division Series. And I say that as a fan who just last night saw his team get bounced from potential postseason play in the Wild Card game.

It’s not fair. But it’s not supposed to be. And it’s perfectly summed up in this tweet:

To next season, we go.

Collins Puts Mets At Strategic Disadvantage

You can say that Terry Collins has players wanting to play for him. You’d be right. You’d can also say that with the sheer quantity of impact injuries the team has suffered that them even being in this spot tonight is incredibly unlikely. You’d also be right about that.

One thing you cannot say, however, is that having Terry Collins calling the shots on your bench – in what is assumed to be a pitcher’s duel tonight in the NL Wild Card game – inspires much confidence in a late-game situation where he would need to outmanage Bruce Bochy.

Collins rode a historic hot streak by Yoenis Cespedes to get into the postseason and then hopped back on the horse to ride Daniel Murphy’s historic hot streak to get into the World Series where he was completely exposed as a dumpster fire of a tactician who trusted history over current results (Michael Cuddyer), was unable to identify when a pitcher in a big spot was gassed (Steven Matz) and was unable to deviate from the script he had written for himself in regards to managing a bullpen that led to him using his closer in less than optimal situations which led to two “blown saves”.

Add that to everything we’ve seen this year. Wilmer Flores is unavailable for the remainder of the season because of an injury sustained in a home-plate collision because Terry Collins admitted he forgot to pinch run for him. The decision early in the season to destroy Jim Henderson. Also, he’s been a mad man using every single player available to him since rosters expanded in September and, should tonight’s game be close in the late innings, I’d be shocked if he’s able to use ONLY 25 players.

The Mets are only carrying 9 pitchers tonight which – in theory – is plenty for one game and maximizes your bench options. But with the way Collins has grown accustomed to playing musical match-ups over the past month, I genuinely have to question if Collins will have the foresight not to burn through all his players and put himself at a disadvantage should the game go into extra innings like last night’s AL Wild Card game.

One thing I can promise is that Collins is no Showalter and won’t be questioned for NOT using a certain player. In a perfect world, the Mets jump on Madison Bumgarner early and take the game out of Collins’ hands. But should Noah Syndergaard give up a couple of early runs and Collins has his hand forced, this could be an ugly game for the blue and orange.