TV Review: ESPN 30 For 30: Doc & Darryl

ESPN continued its phenomenal 30 for 30 series the other night with “Doc & Darryl” directed by Judd Apatow.On paper, you’d think this was made for me. In execution? Eh…kinda.

When this was first announced, I was obviously interested, but skeptical at the same time. It’s one of those stories that – as a Met fan – you know all too well. You’ve heard all the scenarios, the fables, the what-ifs. I imagined that this was it was like for a hardcore comic book fan to see a new interpretation of a Spider-Man movie.

My biggest fear was put to rest in the first minute when Apatow states during his introduction of the film that, “This is not a story about 1986.” That genuinely worried me. I say it way too much, but the Mets are a franchise with very little in terms of great players and history so it becomes tiring to keep going back to 1986. Especially this year when we’ve been besieged with the 30th anniversary of that last Mets championship team. I’m kind of 86’d out.

Which, by proxy, means I’m kind of Doc and Darryl’d out too. So yes, this wasn’t a story about 1986, but it was still a tragic tale that was all too familiar to those of us who lived through the rise and fall of two of the most talented players the Mets have ever had.

Even though I saw pretty early on that I probably wouldn’t get any new information out of it, I still enjoyed it for what it was and think people with only a casual knowledge of the subjects would like it even more.

I do have a major problem, however. It has nothing to do with the movie, really, but the ease of making a “what-if” story about two young, black kids in the 80s who lost what could have been legendary careers when alcohol and cocaine ran rampant throughout all of not just the major leagues, but society in the 80s.

Yes, it’s sad that Doc blew the chance for a few more Cy Youngs and 300 wins up his nose. It’s sad that Darryl drank away 500 homers and the chance to be as revered in Queens as Reggie Jackson in the Bronx. But it’s equally as sad to see someone like Steve Howe (the 1980 NL Rookie of the Year) be suspended 7 times and die at 48 with meth in his system. Or Darrell Porter, a first round pick and multiple time All Star who was one of the first players to be open about his use die at 50 from what an autopsy revealed was “toxic effects of cocaine”.

The focus on Doc and Darryl is because it further pushes the narrative of the black community immersed in drug culture. Sure, it serves as a cautionary tale for those learning their stories, but it also scapegoats them as the posterboys for an epidemic which isn’t fair.

The movie is good enough. I’m sure there will be stories and factoids that people will be surprised to learn, but if you’re a big Mets fan or of either of these two players, there’s probably not much in here that you haven’t heard before.

I do hope that finally we can let these two be, though. Dragging them out every few years to write a new book or TV piece where they have to come up with some new scandalous story to keep things fresh is kind of tired.

If you haven’t yet caught this, “Doc & Darryl” can be caught streaming on the WatchESPN app.

Contact on Twitter: @MaximusSexPower or e-mail: ShoesOnSports@gmail.com

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